Category Archives: Dresses

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Trend Report: The Cape

It’s 2014, and you do not have to be a superhero to wear a cape, these days. Now we wouldn’t recommend that you start rummaging through old Halloween costumes in search of that black cape with a batman logo, but we would recommend that you follow the lead of famous trailblazers like Gwyneth or Lupita.

The world of fashion first adopted the cape in the early 1900s when a tailor by the name of Paul Poiret began to experiment with it’s shape and texture. Poiret began to add velvet, patterns and fur trimmings to the historic costume.

The trendy cloak seems to make it’s way back in to style every now and again, each time with more drama and more creativity.

At the 2012 Oscars, Gwyneth Paltrow reintroduced us to the cape and all its wonders.

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And just when we thought we couldn’t have wanted a cape more, Lupita Nyong’o rocked a stunning Ralph Lauren gown, complete with a built-in cape, at this year’s Golden Globe Awards. The elegant strapless gown reminded us that capes can add a touch of style to any outfit on any occasion.

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Little Black Dress

How the Little Black Dress became the LBD

With its own initialed moniker, the Little Black Dress has earned its chops along side fashion icons like YSL, CDG and SJP. In 1926, Coco Chanel created an Icon- the first LBD graced the pages of Vogue as a go to garment for women with great taste. For decades the Little Black Dress has saved the day.

After years spent in heavy, long clothing during the Victorian Era and the Belle Epoque, Chanel’s ford dress gave women a liberating sense of mobility, and ease. The chic garment was simple and flattering for women of all shapes and sizes.

The LBD maintained its popularity throughout the great depression and World War II because of its simplicity. After all, Vogue named the dress after the Ford Model T, because it was accessible to women of all socio-economic levels. Women didn’t have to spend a lot of money to keep up with Mrs. Jones, shall we say.

Coming off of it’s war time successes, postwar conservative era brought the popularity of the LBD into question. Though it was still worn, women perceived the LBD to be a little bit dangerous or risqué. Gone were the days where the LBD was associated with purity and modesty.

The youngsters of the swinging sixties took the iconic garment to new lengths. While older more conservative set preferred classic sheaths, like the number worn by Audrey Hepburn in Breakfast at Tiffany’s, the younger generations were introducing the mini LBD.

Aside from that little blip in the 1950s, the LBD has maintained its staple status and continues to reign as queen of the closet. However, that is not to say that the dress hasn’t had its good years and its bad years. In the 60’s we saw the mod mini dress, the 80’s introduced the big shoulders and peplum waistline, 90’s grunge style brought a whole new meaning to LBD. Regardless, despite the comings and goings of various generational fashion trends, the concept behind the LBD has remained very much the same as the one Coco Chanel introduced us to in 1926.

The little black dress, is common currency amongst women across the globe because regardless of the cut, the fabric or the cost, the LBD makes a women feel glamorous.

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